How mindfulness can help your freelancer business

Guest Post by Helen Ellwood

Even 10 minutes a day of mindfulness practice can help you become a mindful freelancer. This will improve your creativity, your concentration and your productivity.

Being your own boss can be stressful. You have to do everything yourself: manage your time, your advertising, your deadlines and your finances and as well as your hopes, your anxieties, your creativity and your chattering mind.

If you run your own business, mindfulness is a useful skill to have. Research has shown that practising mindfulness helps us to become more aware. Greater awareness helps us make wiser choices.

It can help you:

  • Keep focused
  • Become more resilient to stress
  • Reduce habitual reactions that get in the way of productivity
  • Become more creative
  • Respond effectively to complex situations
  • Manage challenges effectively
  • The science of mindfulness is a huge topic, so I’m going to focus on a few key points.

Time management

How mindfulness can help your freelancer business .pngBeing a freelancer often involves working long hours.  Some people believe that it’s important to carry on working, even when tired. They feel like heroes as they stagger about with sweaty armpits and cups of strong coffee, trying to meet that deadline when taking a break would’ve been wiser.

The mindful freelancer knows that it’s more efficient to take regular breaks. You only need a few minutes of deep breathing, brisk walking, or stretching to recharge your batteries. When you come back to work, you’re refreshed and are working once more at peak performance. If you happen to be chopping logs all day, you would occasionally sharpen your axe. The mind needs sharpening in the same way.

Planning versus worrying

When you next find your mind going round and round like a washing machine tangling all the socks of your mind with pointless worry about the future or the past, just ask yourself a simple question. Is this situation something I have any control over? If so, then stop worrying and make a plan. Get out of bed. Put on your favourite slippers and make a cup of chamomile tea. Put your plan down on paper, but set a time limit on this so that you don’t spend all night working. Go back to bed and sleep like a kitten.

If, in fact, you’re worrying about something you can’t control, then let it go. Let it go you say. How on earth do we let go of our worries? The next little chunk may be of help.

Stepping back from negative thoughts

How mindfulness can help freelancersJust for a moment, I’d like you to shut your eyes and think of anything but white rabbits. You must not think of white rabbits! Now open your eyes. I bet you saw lots and lots of cute little white bunnies bouncing around your inner mind, and the more you told them to go away, the more they bred. Hundreds of tiny little white cuties hopping around. It’s the same with any thought. If we tell ourselves we must not think negatively, or if we to force ourselves to have a quiet mind, we will just increase the chatter.

Mindfulness teaches us how to step back from our thoughts. We learn how to choose which thoughts we would like to follow and which we would not. In other words, we develop more control and can exercise choice. Thoughts become a tool we can use rather than something that defines who we are.

Thoughts are not facts!

How mindfulness can help freelancers blogThoughts are powerful and often believable. However, they are only thoughts. When you say to yourself, “I absolutely, totally must have that piece of chocolate cake”, you’re falling victim to an opinion, not a fact. You can choose not to have that cake and become a slim and healthy being. Maybe this isn’t such a good example. Chocolate cake is of course extremely important.

Concentration

Regular mindfulness meditation increases our ability to focus our awareness. Studies have shown that just a small amount every day increases the number of neurones in the brain relating to concentration. As Daniel Goleman says in his recent book, Focus, we can learn to increase our ability to concentrate on our inner world, the outer world (the bigger picture) and we can increase our empathy and compassion for other people and ourselves.

Compassion and empathy help us relate better to the people we work with and helps to create a happy world.

Creativity

Another vital skill freelancers need is creativity. There are mindfulness exercises which encourage the ability to widen out our awareness to include all that we can sense. A creative brain is open, flexible and attentive. When you are on automatic pilot, often preoccupied with worries and concerns, it’s hard to be creative since the neocortex is rigid. When you are mindful, creative ideas can float to the surface of your flexible brain. – J Greenberg, K Reiner, N Meiran  2012

So, in a nutshell, even 10 minutes a day of mindfulness practice can help you become a mindful freelancer. This will, in turn, improve your creativity, your concentration, your productivity, your ability to relate well to others and will allow you to learn to respond to situations in a skilful way.


Helen Ellwood writer NaNoWriMoHelen Ellwood is a writer, artist and occupational therapist, with training in psychotherapy and mindfulness. She is interested in the subtle dividing line between fantasy and reality, and in the fluid nature of experience. She has had three plays staged, has been a member of the scriptwriting team for two BBC funded docudramas, has had short stories broadcast by BBC Radio Derby and has been published in short story anthologies.

In 2014 her memoir, Message in a Bottle was long-listed for the Mslexia Memoir Competition. She is currently working on a weird fiction romance novel, The Girl, the Boy and the Breadfruit Tree.

Twitter:     @helenellwood

Get expert tips on what makes good writing, how to make your copywriting accessible and how to inspire your customers with your words.


Nici West Freelance Copywriter LondonI’m Nici, a freelance copywriter and editor based in London. I love writing about making writing accessible, mental health issues, art careers and tips to run your business better. And I LOVE editing full-length novels. Contact me here. 

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Start-Up Stories 5. Curious Things

Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project.

 

Curious Things Start-up advice

Who are you?

Hello everyone! I’m Lenni Sanders, co-producer of Curious Things

Tell us about Curious Things

Curious Things start-up adviceCurious Things is me and the excellent poet Harry Jelley. We make interactive performances, often for museums and heritage organisations, and we also run workshops on topics ranging from event planning to creative writing. We’ve been working together for just over two years (although we only quite recently rebranded to Curious Things this spring so if you’re wondering where any record of us is before then,  we used to be called iOrganic!)

We want to make performances that are playful and accessible, and when we explore heritage we aim to do it in surprising, unexpected ways.

Curious Things makes interactive performances for people who didn’t necessarily know they wanted to be part of an interactive performance today but who is up for a laugh. Increasingly a strand of our work is aimed at family audiences.

What’s your story?

Harry Curious Things start-up adviceWe started working together when Harry found a call-out for submissions for Sensored, a one-day festival of work about the senses at Contact, programmed by RE:CON the Young Producing Team. We proposed a show called Empty Kitchen in which an audience of up to six people sits around a table, and we create a restaurant experience for them without using any food – using spoken word, a variety of textures and objects to touch, and pre-recorded video and audio to suggest the taste instead.

We wanted a name for ourselves that had something to do with food and technology so we called our project iOrganic – a name which we then spent the following year and a half explaining to people! We were delighted to be programmed by Contact to perform at Sensored, and had a fantastic week making our first collaborative work. The support of the RE:CON team was invaluable, and we also received lots of really helpful feedback from Artistic Director Matt Fenton.

So, Lenni, what happens behind the scenes?

Day to day, we look around for opportunities and communicate with each other if we’ve found something we want to apply for, on the Arts Jobs listings site or elsewhere. We are very eager to take opportunities to do types of work that will give us new experiences. Although we have workshop facilitation experience separately and had run workshops for adults together when Est 1761 invited us to plan and deliver a workshop for groups of Year 5s visiting the Bridgewater Canal we jumped at the chance to run our first workshop for children together at the start of this year.

When there’s an opportunity to try something new, we’re excited by challenges.

We also contact museums and heritage organisations to ask if we can meet them for a chat about our work – if, in the end,  there isn’t space in their programme to book us,  we’ve still had an interesting conversation with a new contact.

Any advice for keen start-ups out there?

Having your own email address for your business is something that was a revelation to me! When we first got Curious Things email addresses, I immediately felt more validated, professional, and confident. The same goes for our business cards. I would also like to add that the longer Curious Things have been going the surer we are about our USP, I guess because we got going quite spontaneously. 

I’ll just say that if you’re not entirely sure where your journey is leading you, that’s ok, and you will find your niche if you keep looking for it and taking opportunities.

Equally, we talk a lot about what makes us ‘us’ and I think that helped us figure out what we’re best at – so I would suggest talk and reflect and come up with lists and manifestos of who you are as a business or project! And you can do that working by yourself as well, of course.

Where can we find you? 

Website: www.curiousthingsperform.com

Twitter: @_CuriousThings

Our email addresses are lenni@curiousthingsperform.com and harry@curiousthingsperform.com if you want to get in touch with us directly! As I live in Manchester and Harry lives in Newcastle, if you live in the North West or North East, you have one of us relatively nearby to go for a coffee with if you like!

START-UP STORIES 4: LONDON ARMY APPAREL


Need help with your writing?Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project. Its aim is to offer advice, motivation and inspirational stories to start-ups, small businesses or those thinking about starting their journey. What’s your story? Contact me if you’d like to be involved. 


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Writing for a new mindfulness website

Hi folks! Just a quick note this week to announce an exciting new job. I’m now officially an online Journalist for the new health and wellness magazine, Sentient Life.

Sentient Life Freelance Copywriter LondonSentient Life aims to help all those in our community lead a more emotionally connected, balanced life. It will feature articles which will inspire, educate and resonate. There will be weekly videos logging the personal journeys of the team as well as a support forum that is moderated by human beings and not computer algorithms to ensure kind, fair and neutral support is given to any and everyone.

They believe physical, emotional and mental support should be available to everyone and through the forum, you can connect with qualified psychotherapists, nutritionists, and experts in wellbeing.

In my role as online Journalist, I will be writing a weekly article and two-minute vlog exploring my personal experiences with various mindfulness and wellness practices and thoughts.

 

Check out some of my articles so far here: 

What a daily mindfulness practice did for me

I’ve heard of mindfulness and have been curious about it for a long time, but I’ve never practised it. Like many people, I’ve dabbled in meditation, seeking some kind of peace and relaxation from the stress of everyday life. I heard that mindfulness was different. That it could teach you how to take a step back from your life and gain perspective. That it was less about relaxation and more about learning to be in control of how you respond to the busy world around you

A silent meditation retreat: Is it worth it?

For many, the scary part of that sentence is: SILENT. And by silent, I mean no talking, no eye contact, no nods, no secret taps on the shoulder or brushing of the hand. The aim is to be completely inside your head for those 10 days and really learn to listen to your internal monologue and what makes it tick. To get to know your impulsive monkey mind. I know what you’re thinking, yes it was bloody hard! But well worth the investment. I’m here to tell you why.

How to talk about sexual abuse in a healthy way 

Talking is healthy. Talking about difficult, sensitive topics can help us unpick and work through complex issues. In light of the Harvey Weinstein revelation, a conversation about sexual abuse is now happening far and wide. #MeToo #SexualAbuse #Therapy #Listening


Get expert tips on what makes good writing, how to make your copywriting accessible and how to inspire your customers with your words.


Nici West Freelance Copywriter LondonI’m Nici, a freelance copywriter and editor based in London. I love writing about making writing accessible, mental health issues, art careers and tips to run your business better. And I LOVE editing full-length novels. Contact me here. 

How NaNoWriMo helped me finish my novel

Guest Post by Helen Ellwood

Send your inner critic into another room to play with some crayons

I don’t know about you, but I’m a complete stationery freak, so in preparation for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) 2015, I bought a new notebook. The cover was dusky blue, decorated with ghostly palm trees and spooky clouds – just right for my new weird fiction novel, The Girl, the Boy and the Breadfruit Tree. I usually write my first draft in long-hand because my brain seems to flow better that way. I then use my voice recognition software to transfer the words from my notebook onto my Mac.

Helen Ellwood writer NaNoWriMoHaving bought some coloured pens, I was ready to start. I found the weekly NaNoWriMo sessions inspiring and encouraging. We enjoyed a healthy bit of ‘writerly’ procrastination over coffee and cake, followed by the bouncing of ideas, the sharing of plots and a couple of hours of solid writing.

I didn’t manage 50,000 words that month, but taking part in something collective and focused helped me make a really good start on my book. I continued to write throughout the rest of the year and managed to complete my first draft by late summer.

Call your inner critic away from its crayons and allow it to edit as many drafts as you need to create something that shines.

I let the book rest for a while, and when the next NaNoWriMo came round, I used the time to do a thorough edit. As before, I used my trusty notebook, now filled with multicoloured highlights and doodles, to gather up potentially discarded ideas and try new ones. The first draft really is just the skeleton. The next rewrite adds flesh and muscles. Each rewrite after that makes the story stronger, more dynamic and more publishable.

As Ernest Hemingway says, “The only kind of writing is rewriting”. He’s said to have rewritten the ending of A Farewell to Arms 39 times before he was satisfied. My castaway memoir, (Message in a Bottle, longlisted for the 2014 Mslexia Memoir Competition) was completely rewritten four times, which is quite mild by Hemingway standards.

Read it aloud to your cat, dog or budgie. This will help you feel the pace and flow of the words.

There obviously comes a point at which continuing to edit begins to destroy the book, but I knew my NaNoWriMo weird fiction story needed to be tightened further. I spent the rest of that year editing and honing it, hoping to enter the Mslexia Novel Competition this year (2017). I knew the ending was a little flabby and that the beginning if told from another character’s point of view, could have been more zesty and exciting, but unfortunately, I ran out of time. But I sent it in any way.

This time, I didn’t get longlisted. That’s okay. Knowing that people all over the country are writing alongside me every November makes the process of being a novelist less isolating. As I look through my dusky blue notebook with its ghostly palm trees, I feel inspired to push myself further and to polish my words until they shine. 

Top ten tips for writing a great novel:

1. Indulge in a new notebook for each project and carry it around wherever you go. You can jot down plot/character ideas and juicy eavesdropped sentences whenever they occur to you.

2. Send your inner critic into another room to play with some crayons while you write your first draft. Just Write. Don’t aim for perfect prose at this point. Let the story flow.

3. Finish a writing session in the middle of a phrase or idea. Begin your next writing session from this point of inspiration. This will mean you have some words to write as soon as you sit down and you’re less likely to get blocked.

4. Some stories are plotted carefully, some are character led. Whatever type of writer you are, allow things to unfold. Don’t be too rigid trying to fit your story into your original concept. Sometimes stories like to squidge sideways like vanilla slices.

5. Rewrite. Edit. Rewrite. This is when the writing process really gets tough. Call your inner critic away from its crayons and allow it to edit as many drafts as you need to create something that shines. Any bits that you’re proud of, but that don’t work in their current situation, can be snipped out and placed in a folder for future use in other projects. There’s no need to throw good writing away.

6. When you feel satisfied that you’ve done your best, put your project in a ‘drawer’ for a month at least and do something else. Eat that chocolate cake you’ve been looking at. Howl at the moon. Lie in the bath surrounded by candles. Whatever you like. You could even write some short stories.

7. Get your story out of the drawer. Read it aloud to your cat, dog or budgie. This will help you feel the pace and flow of the words.

8. Have your PC or Kindle read the story out loud to you. Close your eyes and listen. Can you truly see your story unfold in your mind

9. Ask someone else to read your book. Not someone who loves you, who is bound to say “it’s fantastic”, but someone who reads and writes in the same genre as you and who is able to give constructive criticism.

10. It’s time to proofread your book. When you’ve done that, get it proofed by someone else, better yet, a professional. It’s almost impossible to pick up every single one of your own errors, especially when you’ve been working on it so closely.

And finally, give your novel a hug, tell it you love it, and send it on its way. Good luck! 

Helen Ellwood - Writer advice for NaNoWriMoHelen Ellwood is a writer, artist and occupational therapist, with training in psychotherapy and mindfulness. She is interested in the subtle dividing line between fantasy and reality, and in the fluid nature of experience. She has had three plays staged, has been a member of the scriptwriting team for two BBC funded docudramas, has had short stories broadcast by BBC Radio Derby and has been published in short story anthologies.

In 2014 her memoir, Message in a Bottle was long-listed for the Mslexia Memoir Competition. She is currently working on a weird fiction romance novel, The Girl, the Boy and the Breadfruit Tree.

Twitter:     @helenellwood

Get expert tips on what makes good writing, how to make your copywriting accessible and how to inspire your customers with your words.


Nici West Freelance Copywriter LondonI’m Nici, a freelance copywriter and editor based in London. I love writing about making writing accessible, mental health issues, art careers and tips to run your business better. And I LOVE editing full-length novels. Contact me here. 

Does NaNoWriMo produce good writing? Quantity VS Quality

NaNo what?! NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writing Month. Or as others know it, November. November is a time when many budding and established writers get together and attempt to write an entire 50,000-word novel in one month, because, well, they love torturing themselves.

national novel writing month freelance copywriter londonIt’s also a great way to learn the discipline of daily writing. In NaNoWriMo, the quality of the end product isn’t the important part, it’s the taking part that counts. The aim is to get through the first draft of that novel you’ve been wanting to write for years but forcing you to write a large number of words in a short period of time, therefore silencing your inner editor and allowing your brain to work through plot, structure and character building. What you’re left with is a pile of mostly weak words, with some useable sentences in between, and a draft of an outline for a novel you hope to improve in its second draft. So how useful is NaNoWriMo for all those budding writers out there?

Quality writing VS Quantity of writing

The copywriter in me says always use the minimum amount of words to explain something well. I, like many, have found myself tackling NaNoWriMo in the past by making my sentences as long and wordy as possible just to hit my final word count.  I’m sure that many participants will agree with me when I say that what you end up writing in NaNoWriMo is not the finest work, in fact, most of it is probably complete jibberish. But, like all good artists, you need a canvas to work with and a filled page is easier to edit than a blank page.

nanowrimo freelance copywriter londonWhile speeding through writing a novel in a month does not produce expert writing, it does produce a hoard full of new novels, many of which go on to be published or self-published. Its immediate effect is the quantity of writing but the after effect is quality if you continue to work really hard on your new novel.

(Next weeks blog will focus on how to edit your novel once you have your full word count! Watch this space).

How to plan good writing

Having a solid plan in place before you start your novel can help improve the quality of your writing. Think about what you want to say and why, and equally what you don’t want to say. I don’t recommend over planning your novel but then it depends on your working style. I like to plan a brief outline to the story events and map out some of the key components of the backstory that help me write the story. I sometimes make notes about character relationships, issues and motives. The rest I figure out as I go along, but it helps me keep my story focused if I pre-plan at least a little of what I want to say.

Here are some top writing planning tools that I sometimes use:

What do you think? Does Nanowrimo produce good writing? What is good writing? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

If you’re thinking of taking part in National Novel Writing Month it’s not too late! Sign up for free and find your local groups here. You don’t need to be physically near a group to take part. That’s the beauty of NaNoWriMo.


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Nici West Freelance Copywriter LondonI’m a freelance copywriter and editor based in London. I love writing about writing, start-ups, networking, literature and running.

Start-Up Stories 4. London Army Apparel

Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project.

LONDON ARMY APPREL Start-up Stories Start-up advice

Who are you?

Angelique of London Army ApparelAngelique Ibrahim – Founder & CEO of London Army Apparel

Tell us about London Army Apparel 

London Army Apparel is a brand collection of high fashion vintage pieces of Army clothing, including Anoraks, Bomber jackets & Parkas from different Armies around the world. They’re curated into fashion collections and are sold online at www.londonarmyapparel.com.

London Army Apparel started earlier this year and by total serendipity. 

The vision of the brand is to empower millennial creatives in cities, like London, who desire clothing that is stylish & sustainable, with authentic stunning clothing collected from the army.

What’s your story?

Bulgarian_quilted_jacket_ LondonarmyapprelI am a certified Prince2 practitioner and use to work in a large corporation. My social life is the polar opposite; I usually hang out in the East & South London arts & music scene where most of my friends are artists, creatives & musicians. I am an artist by nature and run several creative projects. So, in tandem with my passion for learning about business models and strategy, I’m equally a left and right brained thinker.

London Army Apparel was born when I wanted to source an authentic military Bomber jacket to wear when socialising in the London scene & had difficulty obtaining one. On a chance encounter on my travels through Europe, I met with a supplier and was able to acquire many stunning military pieces.

When music bands and creatives alike were constantly asking me where I’d bought my clothing, I quickly realised that a lot of people could not access this kind of clothing and that there was a gap in the market.

So, Angelique, what happens behind the scenes?

italian_denim_jacket_LondonarmyapparelLondon Army Apparel is still in its foetal days, so, like all start-ups, there is no set routine to my day. The operation is still relatively small and solutions come from creative ideas and resourcefulness rather than throwing huge budgets at anything. I usually read and answer my emails every day. I phone contacts to touch base and get operations moving along.

french_rain_mac_LondonarmyapparelI also read constantly. I read books on different business methodologies & strategies. I’m building my audience by connecting with people who I have an affinity with and get the brand and its ethos. I’m not interested in quick wins where I just get a sleazy sale out of anyone. That goes against the values I and the brand have.

Any advice for keen start-ups out there?

The best time to start a business is when you start thinking about starting a business. Don’t be deterred by limitations in resources & time, those limitations will always be there.  

The two main things you need to create your business is dreams & drive: dreams to imagine and the drive to make your dreams happen.

Where can we find you? 

Website & E-shop: www.londonarmyapparel.com

Instagram: @londonarmyapparel

Pinterest: @londonarmyapparel

Facebook: @londonarmyapparel

START-UP STORIES 3: STORGY


Need help with your writing?Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project. Its aim is to offer advice, motivation and inspirational stories to start-ups, small businesses or those thinking about starting their journey. What’s your story? Contact me if you’d like to be involved. 


Sign up to my newsletter

Lost for Words Copywriting Newsletter Freelance Copywriter LondonI love sharing my tips on productivity, writing and start-ups. Click here to sign up to my newsletter to make sure you don’t miss out on the useful tools to help you reach your ideal readers!

How to write a good blog post

Blogs are a great tool to promote your business or project. They can help you communicate your ethos, aims, personality and expertise and give you more control over your content than advertisements or direct marketing. And if you buy into the school of thought that it takes a customer seven views before they purchase, blogs are a fantastic tool to gain repeated exposure.

But how do you write a blog and how do you write it well? The following points will help you create a blog post that people will want to read and share. So, here’s my guide to:

Writing Good Blog Posts

Who are you writing for?
Consider your audience, or your desired audience, and think about what they’d like to read about. Don’t just rush ahead writing about topics you’re interested in, listen to what you’re readers are talking about and join in the conversation. That said, I recommend experimenting with leading the conversation but play close attention to how people are responding. Are you saying things that people actually want to hear?

How to write a good blog post.pngMake it fun and easy to read
In my opinion, a great blog post is fun, accessible, interesting and memorable as well as a good balance between formal and informal. Think about your tone-of-voice and the personality you want to portray. A little bit of humour always livens-up a blog post!

Don’t be selfish, include others
No one wants to hear about you for twenty minutes. A blog isn’t a monologue (sort-of). Mention other people’s work that you admire or that you think your readers might find interesting. Like this blog on How to Put Together a Highly Clickable Email from The Freelance Lifestyle Blog.

Structure
Have a clear, easy-to-follow structure that doesn’t distract from the content. Break up your text with headings, subheadings and bullet points. It’s easier to read shorter blocks of text on a screen. Make sure you introduce your idea, stay on topic and conclude with a clear call to action (what you want your readers to do in response to the blog). Why are you writing about your chosen topic? What do you want your readers to take-away from your blog? Any final thoughts (NOT Jerry Springer style)?

I’ve put together a blog template below to help you structure and plan your posts. Feel free to right-click the image to save it or share it!

Blog Writing Template: How to Write a Good Blog Post

Blog Writing Template - How to write a good blog post

And finally, proofread, proofread, proofread.

Check for spelling mistakes, typos, tone-of-voice consistency and accuracy. The neater your blog, the happier your readers 🙂

That’s all my tips for now. I hope you find these useful! If you need any help planning your blog content for the year or perfecting your writing skills, get in touch.

What are your top tips for good blog writing? Let me know in the comments below!


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Nici West Freelance Copywriter LondonI’m a freelance copywriter and editor based in London. I love writing about writing, start-ups, networking, literature and running.

“A promising but problematic debut” – Gather the Daughters by Jennie Melamed

“A promising but problematic debut.” My review of Gather the Daughters by Jennie Melamed for Book Munch.

Bookmunch

gtdjmJennie Melamed’s debut novel, Gather the Daughters, drags us into a strange society on an isolated island where gender roles are twisted and magnified. It depicts a dystopian future, not unlike that in Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, in which the women are kept under strict control and play a very limited role in the society they live in. They are used as wives-in-training until their summer of fruition where they are temporarily cast free to run, fight and set up camp until they must settle with a husband. Then, they must have children, until they are no longer useful.

This small and radical society is kept under the strict rationing of knowledge and history, controlled breeding and destined gender roles; the daughters are wives-in-training and the boys grow up knowing that they will reign inside and outside the home. Narrated by four of the young girls at varying…

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Do you trust your intuition? Feature article in Psychologies Magazine

You might see a familiar face in November’s issue of Psychologies magazine. Turn to page 70 and you’ll see me talking about gut instincts, shark attacks and forest fires! Real life experiences that I’ve had where I’ve listened to my heart instead of my head – and thank god I did!

Psychologies Magazine press freelance copywriter London

You know that danger you feel in the pit of your stomach? I could sense something terrible was about to happen.

Psychologies MagazineI’m feeling super luck that Psychologies Magazine included my business website at the bottom of the article. I follow a PR expert called Janet Murray who offers advice to new businesses like mine on how to get free PR and publicity without sending out a press release. Thanks to Janet’s advice, I responded to a call-out on Twitter for stories about times you’ve felt a gut instinct and whether you listened to it. Little did I know the article was for a piece for Psychologies Magazine!

It was a really fun project to be involved with. The magazine sent a professional photographer and hair and make-up team to my flat in South East London. All three of us squeezed into my tiny one-bed-flat to get ready, which involved picking bold Psychologies magazine freelance copywriter Londoncolourful clothes like the ones pictured. We took a few photos in the communal garden of me standing in a bush with bright orange berries, while the squirrels fought behind us. I can only guess I looked very hungry, as the photographer kept asking me to touch the berries and look up at the bush!

We then moved to Crystal Palace Park to explore where the dinosaurs live (have you ever been to the Dinosaur Park? It’s one of my favourite areas in London!). Amongst battling with curious pigeons, parents and toddlers and very excitable doggies, we managed to capture this photo, near one of the large dinosaur areas. They wanted the photo to look bright and aspirational – I think they captured the sunlight really well!

What’s your experience of gut instincts? Have you ever had to listen to your heart above your head? What do you think would have happened if you didn’t? You can check out the latest issue of the magazine from any local newsagents, and follow Psychologies Magazine on Twitter here. 


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Start-up Stories 3. STORGY

Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project.

Storgy Magazine Logo

Who are you?

Hi, I’m Tomek Dzido, Managing Director

What’s your business?

STORGY 

Tell us about STORGY

Our mission is to inspire artistic collaboration and provide opportunities for creative minds to meet.

STORGY is an online Arts & Entertainment Magazine specializing in short fiction, interviews, movie reviews, book reviews, and more. STORGY Magazine was established in 2013 by Tomek Dzido and Anthony Self as a means to explore the short story form and engage with readers and artists alike. 

We’ve published over 500 short stories by over 300 authors from across the world.  In 2017 a successful Kickstarter campaign raised the required funds to launch the eagerly anticipated STORGY BOOKS. We take great pride in discovering emerging talent while celebrating the word of established authors and artists.

What’s your story?

STORGY Start-up StoriesSTORGY was born from a shared love of literature and an immense passion for the written word and creative arts. It began as a writing exercise between a core group of writers who were each tasked with writing a story inspired by a title and/or photograph.

Shortly after these stories were published on our website, we started receiving general submissions from unpublished authors. In 2016 we launched a review section, which focuses on book reviews and film reviews, and we’re now preparing to release our very first print publication; EXIT EARTH, thanks to all our wonderful backers over at Kickstarter.

So, Tomek, what happens behind the scenes?

Start-Up Stories 3. STORGY Lost for Words Copywriting freelance copywriter London.pngThe day-to-day running of STORGY consists of receiving and reading submissions, communicating with authors, artists, and industry experts, writing and editing reviews, preparing and scheduling publications for the website, and more recently, planning for the release of our very first print book. Due to the fact that we have thus far existed as a non-profit organization, our readership has grown organically via word of mouth and the hard work of all involved. Our strategy remains one of collaboration and we strive to build relationships with authors, artists, and readers. 

Any advice for keen start-ups out there?

Be more than a manager; be human. Balance the care of your business with a care for yourself. Always, respect your budget.

Any business will experience ups and downs, both financial and psychological. My advice would be to treat others with respect and make sure you surround yourself with like-minded people you can rely on and trust, and who in turn, can trust you too. Nothing is more important than relationships and teamwork, and only when you have such a team, can you overcome any obstacle which is thrown your way. Be kind and courteous and remember that everyone, just like you, is susceptible to emotional and physical despair.

Where can we find you? 

www.storgy.com

Support our Kickstarter project for Exit Earth Anthology 

Facebook: @morest0rgy

Instagram: @morestorgy

Twitter: @morestorgy

START-UP STORIES 2: JUDITH PETERHOFF JEWELLERY


Need help with your writing?Start-up Stories is a blog series following the lives of inspiration self-starters who are running their own business or project. Its aim is to offer advice, motivation and inspirational stories to start-ups, small businesses or those thinking about starting their journey. What’s your story? Contact me if you’d like to be involved. 


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Lost for Words Copywriting Newsletter Freelance Copywriter LondonI love sharing my tips on productivity, writing and start-ups. Click here to sign up to my newsletter to make sure you don’t miss out on the useful tools to help you reach your ideal readers!

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